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Issue #592

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2014 Media Kit

Cold ironing exploration gets

By: | at 08:00 PM | Ports & Terminals  

Port Everglades got the “green light” from the Broward County Commission to begin exploring the possibility of installing shore-side power, commonly called “cold ironing,” at the new Cruise Terminal 18, which will be the year-round homeport terminal for Royal Caribbean International’s Oasis-class ships. If deemed fiscally and operationally feasible, Port Everglades will become the first seaport on the East Coast of the United States to install cold ironing. 

Cold ironing allows a ship to shut off its engines and operate with shore-side electrical power from Florida Power & Light (FPL) as opposed to burning diesel fuel while the ship is docked in the port. Cruise ships need power even while docked to run all onboard systems such as air conditioning and lighting. 

“I want to applaud our Port Director Phil Allen and his staff for taking the initiative and working with Royal Caribbean to take the lead in this proactive environmental measure,” said Broward County Mayor Stacy Ritter. “This is what we should be doing—leading the way as a County to reduce the effects of greenhouse gases. This is truly outstanding.” 

Royal Caribbean Cruises LTD (RCL), parent company of Royal Caribbean International, has expressed an interest in partnering with Broward County and FPL to install the cold ironing infrastructure at Port Everglades, according to Port Everglades Director Phillip C. Allen. The Broward County Commission directed Port staff today, June 9, 2009, through a Memorandum of Understanding, to pursue further cost recovery options to recoup the estimated $6.4 million expenditure to install the cold ironing infrastructure. 

Broward County Commissioner Kristin D. Jacobs indicated that by shutting down the engines and using electric shore-side power on the Oasis-class ships, which will be the two largest cruise ships in the world, each ship will experience annual reductions of 40.9 percent less CO2 emissions, 97.7 percent less nitrogen oxide emissions, 95.2 percent less sulfur dioxide emissions, and 88.1 percent less particulate matter. “This steps Broward County up to the forefront and helps us shine.” 

At Cruise Terminal 18 in Port Everglades, Royal Caribbean and Broward County will connect to the FPL power grid, which will require Broward County to execute a new interconnection agreement with FPL. 

“Cold ironing at Port Everglades is an ultra-proactive voluntary measure to protect our environment,” said Port Director Phillip C. Allen. “The U.S. Navy, and ports in Alaska and on the West Coast have used shore-side power successfully to reduce existing pollution from ships. Fortunately, we have good air quality in Broward County today, and we want to employ technology wherever we can to protect and make it better. Further, I applaud the leadership of RCL to go beyond what is required and their embrace of a truly green partnership.” 

In November 2009, Port Everglades will become the year-round homeport for the first of Royal Caribbean International’s Oasis-class of ships, Oasis of the Seas. The second Oasis-class ship, Allure of the Seas, is scheduled to sail year-round from the South Florida cruise port beginning in December 2010. The largest cruise ships ever built, each Oasis-class ship is like a floating city, with neighborhoods that feature innovative themed designs, including specialized entertainment and dining venues. Each ship has 16 decks, encompasses 220,000 gross registered tons (GRT), carries 5,400 guests at double occupancy and features 2,700 staterooms.