AJOT Digital Edition
Issue #584 | Breakbulk Quarterly

Cover of issue_584.png

Breakbulk Quarterly

View Issue #584 Now!

2014 Media Kit
  • Share this article:

TIACA air cargo forum in Kuala Lumpur

By: | at 08:00 PM | Channel(s): Air Cargo  

Aviation security, the environment and market prospects and challenges for Asia will top the agenda when government regulators join thousands of senior executives from the world of air cargo in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from November 4-6th 2008 for the 24th International Air Cargo Forum & Exposition organized by TIACA (The International Air Cargo Association).

Despite the economic challenges affecting world trade, TIACA has once again attracted a record number of exhibitors with over 200 companies from across the globe taking more than 400 exhibition booth spaces. ACF 2008 will also host the highest number of airline exhibitors ’ 68 in total ’ in the history of the event as well as hundreds more freight forwarder participants who will be visiting the three-day exhibition, including over 300 top local and regional freight forwarders that are members of the WCA Family of Logistics Networks.

Jack Boisen, Chairman of TIACA, said: ‘Kuala Lumpur in the heart of Asia is a great place to come and do business. By combining this location with the quality and quantity of exhibitors and delegates the TIACA Air Cargo Forum always attracts, companies clearly see this an opportunity to cement their existing business relationships, develop new commercial opportunities, hear what’s new in our industry and network with other senior executives. The event will be attended by decision-makers from airlines, airports, freight forwarders, courier and express companies, ground handlers and general sales agents, road transport providers, systems and equipment suppliers. Right now, every business needs a boost and November 4-6th in Kuala Lumpur is the time and place to find it.’

The conference agenda begins on November 5th by looking at market prospects for Asia. It will debate whether Asia, led by China as the ‘world’s factory’ can lead the way to air cargo growth.‘It will also discuss the market forces’driving the Asian economy and how they will affect air cargo’in the mid and long term?
Moderated by a senior journalist from the Wall Street Journal Asia, the panel will consist of Edward’Clayton, Principal of Booz & Company Malaysia, Randy Tinseth, Vice President Marketing, Boeing Commercial’Airplanes and Dr. Ting Ho, Deputy Director of Symphony Holdings.

Security will take centre-stage in the afternoon session of day one. With new US legislation mandating 100% piece-level’screening of air cargo that originates in the US and is transported on a passenger aircraft by 2010, speakers will discuss the importance of closer international’cooperation and how changes should be coordinated on a worldwide basis.

Edward J. Kelly, General Manager for Cargo Transportation Sector’Network Management, TSA, US Department of’Homeland Security, is traveling to Kuala Lumpur to address TIACA delegates while an Asian perspective will be given by Captain Roshan Joshi, Senior Manager, Corporate Safety, Security & Quality for Singapore Airlines Cargo and Tom Wheelwright, Senior Vice President of Public Policy Asia-Pacific, DHL Express. The session will be chaired by Jack Boisen, Chairman of TIACA’and a highly respected voice on the subject of aviation security.

Day two will open with a debate looking at concerns on how aviation’affects the environment. This will look to identify the true environmental impact’of aviation and how the industry is addressing this ever growing’issue and the consequences of these actions. Moderator Simon Keeble, Editor of Air Cargo’World, will host a panel of experts including David Jensen, Lead Counsel’Regulatory Affairs at FedEx Express and Andrew Herdman, Director General of the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines. Peter Bombay, International Aviation, Director General for Energy and Transport, EU has also been invited to be on the panel.

The conference will close by looking at market driven challenges in Asia. The region’s strong growth and rapidly changing business model poses challenges as well as creating new opportunities for air cargo leaders. Globalization, security, fuel prices, environmental issues a