Carol Notias Lambos awarded the 2016 CONNIE from The Containerization & Intermodal Institute

Sandy Hook Pilots Association Receives Lifetime Achievement Recognition

Back row: Captain Richard Schoenlank, President, New Jersey Sandy Hook Pilots Association, and Captain John DeCruz, President, New York Sandy Hook Pilots Association, accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award on behalf of the Sandy Hook Pilots Association. Front row: Connie Award recipient, Carol N. Lambos of The Lambos Firm with CII President, Michael DiVirgilio
Back row: Captain Richard Schoenlank, President, New Jersey Sandy Hook Pilots Association, and Captain John DeCruz, President, New York Sandy Hook Pilots Association, accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award on behalf of the Sandy Hook Pilots Association. Front row: Connie Award recipient, Carol N. Lambos of The Lambos Firm with CII President, Michael DiVirgilio

Newark, NJ (December 9, 2016) - Carol Notias Lambos, partner of The Lambos Firm LLP, was presented with the 2016 CONNIE Award by the Containerization & Intermodal Institute (CII) for her active involvement in maritime labor and positive influence within the international transportation industry. The New York and New Jersey Sandy Hook Pilots Association received the Lifetime Achievement Award. The sold-out Connie Luncheon with 365 attendees was held Monday, December 5, 2016 at the Metropolitan Room at the Newark Club, and also saw record-breaking scholarship presentations, totaling more than $125,000.

For 45 years, Connie recipients have been acknowledged for their significant contributions to containerization in world trade and the transportation industry. This prestigious award honors their individual accomplishments or the companies at which they have built their careers and the impact they have made.

In addition, Michael J. DiVirgilio, CII president, led a tribute and showed an eight-minute video o the life of The Honorable Helen Delich Bentley, a maritime journalist and legislator, who passed away in August at age 92. Ms. Bentley was also a board member and long-time supporter of CII.

“Those inspiring individuals of intermodalism had the courage to innovate, incubate, and initiate the great container revolution that made the world a much smaller place and improved the standard of living and quality of life for so many,” said Ms. Lambos, on accepting her award, presented by John Atkins, president of Global Container Terminals, and addressing the honor of being in the company of previous Connie Award recipients.

Since the start of her career, Ms. Lambos has remained engaged in issues regarding the method and manner, particularly in the labor-management arena, in which containerized cargo is transported and handled. She has been instrumental in the production of white papers and presentations regarding the international supply chain, port productivity and the economic importance of the marine transportation system.

Recently, Ms. Lambos has been at the forefront in exploring issues concerning funding the costs of maritime security and the implementation of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) program. She serves on the Coast Guard’s Area Maritime Security Committee of the Port of New York and New Jersey.

Today, she advises industry stakeholders on collective solutions for environmentally sensitive, efficient, and secure cargo handling operations. She also counsels employers on implementing effective anti-harassment and diversity policies and designs training programs to effectively communicate those policies.

The New York and New Jersey Sandy Hook Pilots Association received the Lifetime Achievement Award for its dedication to the safety and efficiency of the harbor operated in the Port of New York and New Jersey. The award was presented by Carmine Ragucci, a senior NY Pilot commissioner.

“It’s an honor to have our 300-year history of contributions to the maritime industry now recognized by CII with this Lifetime Achievement Award,” said Captain Richard Schoenlank, president, New Jersey Sandy Hook Pilots Association, who accepted the honor with Captain John DeCruz, President, New York Sandy Hook Pilots Association.

“For three centuries, our highly skilled pilots have devoted their careers to providing safe passage through the Port of New York and New Jersey. And looking to the future, I am confident that we are prepared for the challenges that lie ahead,” said Captain Schoenlank, referring to the raising of the Bayonne Bridge that will allow for mega-carriers to call at the port.

The services of the nearly 80 self-employed pilots that make up the New York and New Jersey Sandy Hook Pilots Association, known collectively as the Sandy Hook Pilots, are crucial to the majority of maritime commerce and maritime industry in this region as they guide vessels from the sea to their berths within the port.

Trained at the maritime academies and universities, the licensed maritime pilots board oceangoing containerships, passenger vessels, other freighters, and tankers, customarily on the open sea near the entrance to the harbor. Today, the Sandy Hook Pilots provides pilotage service for the bi-state port, the Hudson River, and Long Island Sound.

At the Connie Awards event, CII also carried out its education mission by presenting more than 25 scholarships to students and institutions that are committed to educating the future generations of the transportation industry. The record-breaking number of scholarships was a result of the generous donations from industry leaders and companies who want to invest in the industry’s future. Under the auspices of CII, more than $700,000 in scholarships have been awarded since 1992.

“The record-breaking number of scholarships proved what we already knew-that industry is filled with generous leaders who understand the importance of investing in the future,” said Mike DiVirgilio, President, CII. “It is our mission to educate and support young talent to encourage them to stay in the industry, and today we are seeing our vision truly take shape.”

Presented by the Honorable Steven Blust, former chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission and vice president of CII, the institute awarded scholarships to students from Rutgers and Seton Hall Universities and the State University of New York Maritime College at Fort Schuyler pursing careers in the industry, as well as awarding the Richard A. Simpson scholarship to a midshipman at the United States Merchant Marine Academy. In an effort to support on-going education, CII awarded a scholarship to the Careers in Transportation Scholarship Fund at Union County College, as did The Lambos Firm and the U. S. Maritime Alliance.

For the first time, CII awarded a scholarship in the name of the late Honorable Helen Delich Bentley to the University of Baltimore’s School of Business General Scholarship Fund. Barbara and Joe Yeninas and Brian Henry Davis also donated two additional scholarships to the General Scholarship Fund at the University of Baltimore’s School of Business in the name of Ms. Bentley.

For the first time, Mediterranean Shipping Company, Sandy Hook Pilots and Portwide Cargo Securing Co. Inc. donated scholarships. Continuing their support were Ceres Terminals, Evergreen Line, Hapag-Lloyd, The Journal of Commerce, Norton Lilly International, the Institute of International Container Lessors, Global Container Terminal, Port of Long Beach, and New York Shipping Association presented scholarships to maritime academy cadets and other college students.

Crowley Maritime Corporation continued their annual scholarship presentation in conjunction with United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, a tradition held since 1992, which commenced the CII scholarship program.

Finally, Global Container Terminals donated a four-year full scholarship to a midshipman to SUNY Maritime College. Global has had a tradition of giving full education opportunities and presently is supporting three deserving students at the school.

All of the recipients have demonstrated a commitment to excellence within their respective programs of study.